Monday, May 5, 2008

Shakespeare & Company in Paris


In the current historical fantasy I'm writing (which brought me to Paris to do some research) my two main characters, Vivianne and François, pass a rather famous bookstore located in the heart of Paris on Rue de la Bucherie, on the Left Bank just opposite Notre Dame Cathedral: Shakespeare and Company.

Shakespeare & Company is situated in the Latin Quarter, which for centuries has been the centre of bohemian Parisian creativity and intelligentsia. For over fifty years, the bookshop has housed numerous writers and hosted readings by published and unpublished authors. Run by Sylvia Whitman, daughter of the legendary George Whitman, the bookstore looks like something in a Harry Potter movie, with stacks upon stacks of all sorts of literature.

Upon entering, you'll find yourself in a place Henry Miller described as "A wonderland of books".

Shakespeare and Company is open evey day from 10:00 to 23:00. If you're touring Paris go check it out. The selection of English books is impeccable, with many by local writers. If you're a young traveling writer looking for a place to crash, Sylvia might put you up too!


















Nina Munteanu is an ecologist and internationally published author of novels, short stories and essays. She coaches writers and teaches writing at George Brown College and the University of Toronto. For more about Nina’s coaching & workshops visit www.ninamunteanu.me. Visit www.ninamunteanu.ca for more about her writing.

3 comments:

Jean-Luc Picard said...

It looks like you found a goldmine of a bookstore in Paris, Nina.

sfgirl said...

It is a delightful place, Jean-luc. Books stacked everywhere, in alcoves, all along walls, all around the desks and cots for weary travelers. Like something out of a fiction novel...Reminded me of that bookstore in the town near Hogwarts...can't recall its name...

sfgirl said...

Here's a challenge...According to Geoffry Cottrell: "In America only the successful writer is important, in France all writers are important, in England no writer is important, and in Australia you have to explain what a writer is."